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V
VBI

VBR
VC1, VC-1
VCD
VCD Header trick
VCDeasy
VCDimager
Vdub
VFR
VfW
VHS
Video Encoding
VIDEO_TS
Virtualdub
VOB



V
VBI
Vertical Blanking Interval - the part of a TV transmission that is blanked, or left clear of viewable content, to allow time for the TV’s electron gun to move from the bottom to the top of the screen as it scans images. This blank area is now being used to broadcast closed captioned and text formatted information.




VBR
Variable Bit Rate - the bitrate can vary at any part of a single video or audio stream. VBR can is used to increase bitrate during high motion scenes in a video or to reduce overall file size. DVD MPEG-2 video is often variable bit rate. Also see CBR (constant bit rate).




VC1, VC-1
VC-1 is a video codec standard. Its most popular implementation is Windows Media Video 9. It is an evolution of the conventional DCT-based video codec design also found in H.261, H.263, MPEG-1, MPEG-2, and MPEG-4. It is widely characterized as an alternative to the latest ITU-T and MPEG video codec standard known as H.264/MPEG-4 AVC. VC-1 contains coding tools for interlaced video sequences as well as progressive encoding. The main goal of VC-1 development and standardization is to support the compression of interlaced content without first converting it to progressive, making it more attractive to broadcast and video industry professionals.
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/VC1




VCD
VCD stands for 'Video Compact Disc' and basically it is a CD that contains moving pictures and sound. If you're familiar with regular audio/music CDs, then you will know what a VCD looks like. A VCD has the capacity to hold up to 74/80 minutes on 650MB/700MB CDs respectively of full-motion video along with quality stereo sound. VCDs use an encoding standard called MPEG-1 to store the video and audio. A VCD can be played on almost all standalone DVD Players and of course on all computers with a DVD-ROM or CD-ROM drive with the help of a software based decoder / player. VCDHelp.com.




VCD Header trick
Some DVD players just can't play SVCD... but in this case and if you are lucky your DVD player may be able to play VCDs that use the "VCD-Header Trick". By changing the "Header" of a SVCD MPEG-2 video file into the one of a VCD2.0 MPEG-1 file and by using it as standard VCD2.0 file, you may be able to play MPEG-2 files with your home DVD player. www.vcdeasy.org/modules.php?name=_Guides&id=VcdTrick




VCDeasy
A freeware VCD / SVCD authoring program for the PC. The program works with the freeware program VCDimager to automate production of video CDs with complex features like menus, chapters and the like. VCDeasy.org




VCDimager
GNU VCDImager is a full-featured mastering suite for authoring, disassembling and analyzing Video CD's and Super Video CD's.

The core functionality consists of directly making Video CD BIN/CUE-style CD images from mpeg files, which (after being written to CDR(W) media) can be played on standalone VCD players or DVD players and on computers running GNU/Linux, MacOS, Windows or any other OS capable of accessing VCD's. BIN/CUE images can be burned with the freeware program cdrdao (please use a recent version, since older ones do not support BIN/CUE-style cuesheets). VCDimager.org




Vdub
Shorthand for Virtualdub




VFR
Variable Frame Rate(VFR) is a term in video compression for a feature supported by some container formats like mkv, mp4, flv which allows for the frame rate to change actively during video playback, or to drop the idea of frame rate completely and set individual timecode for each frame.




VfW
Video for Windows (VfW) The first video capture and display system developed by Microsoft for the Windows operating system. The design of VfW video capture was optimized for capturing movies to disk. Features important to video conferencing, TV viewing, capture of video fields, and ancillary data streams are missing from the VfW architecture. To circumvent these limitations, vendors augmented VfW by implementing proprietary extensions. However, without standardized interfaces, applications that use these features must include hardware-dependent code.

With the integration of DVD, MPEG decoders, video decoders and tuners, video port extensions (VPE), and audio codecs on single adapters, a unified driver model that supports all these devices and handles resource contention simplifies development efforts.

The stream class driver provides a framework for addressing these issues. It supports a uniform streaming model for standard and custom data types. Similarly, property sets for most standard devices are defined and can easily be extended if needed. Because the stream class follows WDM streaming conventions, it supports data transfer between kernel drivers without requiring a thread to transition to user mode. Thus there is no decrease in system performance associated with thread context switches between user-mode and kernel-mode.

Due to the large installed base of VfW applications, it is anticipated that VfW drivers will continue to flourish for devices that are primarily used for capturing movies. Capture devices that are used primarily for TV viewing and video conferencing are expected to migrate more quickly from the VfW model to the WDM streaming model.

To bridge the VfW and WDM worlds, a mapper is provided as part of the operating system. This component, called the VfW-to-WDM mapper, makes WDM drivers appear as VfW drivers for legacy applications.

Virtualdub uses only VfW drivers, not the newer WDM interface. MS Info




VHS
VHS an analog format capable of delivering 240 lines of video resolution, along with stereo sound that's nearly as good as CD (in dynamic range and frequency response). Blank tapes usually feature either 120 minutes or 160 minutes of recording time at the highest recording speed (6 hours or 8 hours at the slowest speed). VHS and VCR's are slowly being phased out in favor of DVD players and other digital tape media.




Video Encoding
The process for changing a video from one format to another by altering the resolution and/or the bitrate. Normally the result of this process is a movie with a different compression. For a proper encoding you need a piece of software and/or hardware, which is called codec.




VIDEO_TS
The UDF file name used for DVD-Video directory on a DVD disc volume. Files under this directory name contain pointers to the sectors on the disc which hold the program streams. Read more about all files in the VIDEO_TS folder here.




Virtualdub
A video capture/processing utility written by Avery Lee for 32-bit Windows platforms (98/NT/2000/XP), licensed under the GNU General Public License (GPL). While not a full featured video editor like Adobe Premiere, it is streamlined for fast linear operations over video. It has batch-processing capabilities for handling large numbers of files and can be extended with third-party video filters. VirtualDub is mainly geared toward processing AVI files, although it can read (not write) MPEG-1 and also handle sets of BMP images. Various offshoot versions are on the web from other developers to handle MP3 and MPEG-2/VOB/AC3. Creator's Site




VOB
All DVD movies are stored in on a DVD video disc in so-called VOB files. VOB files usually contain multiplexed Dolby Digital audio and MPEG-2 video. VOB files on a DVD are numbered as follows: vts_XX_y.vob where XX represents the title and Y the part of the title. There can be 99 titles and 10 parts, although vts_XX_0.vob does not contain any video, usually just menu or navigational information. You can find them on a DVD video disc in a subdirectory labelled VIDEO_TS (all upper case).

All VOB files are essentially MPEG2 Program streams with audio, video, sub-picture and navigation data multiplexed. A VOB file is organized as a set of cells; a cell is a basic unit of play data. Each cell consists of a sequence of units called VOBUs. Each VOBU is a sequence of
packs. The first pack in a VOBU is a navigation pack and contains Program Control Information (PCI) packet and Data Search Information (DSI) packet. The remaining packs contain audio,
video and sub-picture data multiplexed together. Each pack has a fixed size of 2048 bytes. A pack typically contains only one data packet and may be stuffed with dummy bytes or a packet
called ‘padding’ bytes/packet to make it a fixed size.
DVD allows easy navigation in its audio and video data. Information for navigation across different VTS is contained in the VMGM. Within a title, the play order of different cells (from one
or more VOBs in the title) is described in a Program Chain (PGC). A PGC is a logical unit to present a part of or the entire Title or Menu. A PGC is further divided into programs. Each program contains integral number of cells. A Title may have one or more PGCs. However, a Title
that has parental guidance levels, will have more than one PGC. Depending on the parental level selected by the DVD disk viewer, the PGCs are selected for being played. PGC contains PGCI
which gives the order of presentation of cells within that PGC.
The information for presentation of a cell, such as the angle information for seamless and nonseamless play and highlight information is contained in the Navigation packs occurring within the
cell.
When playing non-seamlessly, the cells within a logical block are placed contiguously. Therefore, during cell presentation, intermittent blocks may have to be skipped depending on the angle information selected by the DVD disk viewer.
An angle block is a logical block containing cells for different angle presentations. During presentation, not all the cells within the block are played. The different angle cells are of almost
the same play time and since they are placed adjacent to each other, the DVD disk viewer can seamlessly change from one angle to another.
When playing a parental level seamlessly, cells from different VOBs may be interleaved in a logical block. Such a block is called an interleaved block. Each unit of VOB that lies in an interleaved block is called an ILVU of that VOB. This means that the cells in a VOB may not be placed contiguously over the physical address space and may be interleaved with ILVUs from other VOBs.










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